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Copyright

Teaching Online

New to or expanding your online teaching? Start here!

Can I upload book chapters or journal articles to Canvas for my students?

  1. Search the library's collections for an online ebook or journal. If so, link to the resource instead of downloading or scanning. The Libraries's subscription agreements cover the copyright permissions for UMKC students - just remember to link, not download and post the pdf. Linking also means every student generates a usage. Usage counts help the Libraries decide whether to keep or cut resources.
  2. If you don't find a resource to link to, evaluate whether posting the scan is within the bounds of fair use. Complete a fair use checklist, decide whether your use is fair, and keep the checklist with your course files to document your good faith effort. Evaluate all four fair use factors holistically. Most UMKC instructors find the "amount and substantiality" and "effect upon the market" factors require the most careful thought:
    • "amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole."
      • Q: How much of a work can I use?
      • A: The law does not set an amount. Many faculty are comfortable with no more than 10% or one chapter or article. During the COVID-19 public health crisis, some faculty are comfortable with 20% of the book's pages. Always use no more than is needed to achieve your educational goal.
    • "the effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work."
      • Uses which are more likely to replace a sale are less likely to be fair (and more likely to get you sued). Individual chapters and articles are often available for sale.
      • Posting content from materials intended as a textbook for the course you are teaching is especially risky.
    • If you do not already have a scan, complete an ILL request for each item (the Libraries are using our ILL system to process scans from our own UMKC collections.) Add a note that says you need the scan for course use and have evaluated for fair use. If your requests are accidentally cancelled, please reply to the cancellation email you receive and let us know. These requests are slightly outside our normal working patterns, so we apologize in advance for any confusion that may come from trying to process them.
    • If you obtained the scan through Interlibrary Loan from a source other than UMKC’s collection and you intend to post it in Canvas, you probably need a license. The Libraries can cover up to $100 in licensing fees per course. Email copyright@umkc.edu More info: Can I post readings I have obtained through interlibrary loan (ILL) to Canvas?
  3. If you determine your use of book chapters is not fair, submit a purchase request to the Libraries for an ebook. Be sure to include your course name and number and if it will be required reading for the course.
  4. If you determine your use of articles is not fair, email copyright@umkc.edu. The Libraries can cover up to $100 in licensing fees per course.
  5. Email copyright@umkc.edu if these options to not meed your needs.

I'd like to require all my students to watch a video online. How do I do that?

  1. Search the library's collections for an online version. For performing arts videos, also check the Libraries' individual video databases. Follow these instructions to create a stable link to the video.
  2. Check these free video resources
  3. Request that the library license the video. Visit https://library.umkc.edu/purchase-request and click on "streaming video request form" to place a request.
    • Most films cost $150+ per semester to license.
    • For commercial release movies, the Libraries generally recommend requiring your students to pay for a short-term rental from a commercial service as part of their course materials. Searching the internet for the title of the film + streaming usually uncovers a variety of options for $3-$5, including subscription services students may already be paying for.
    • Documentaries, educational films, and independent films are often unavailable on the commercial market and the Libraries can sometimes license them.
    • The Libraries expend more funds for large courses, because this benefits more students.
  4. The Kansas City, MO Public Library maintains a subscription to Kanopy, a good source of independent, international, and documentary films. Using Kanopy requires a free KCMO Public Library eCard, available online to any KC metro resident. Kanopy is a good option for supplemental viewing and individual projects.
  5. Email copyright@umkc.edu if these options do not meet your needs.

Can I incorporate short film clips in my online class?

  1. If the clip is posted online by an entity that appears to have right to the film, link to that clip. When you link, you do not make a copy. Embedding also does not make a copy, only shows the linked item within your page. YouTube instructions to create links that start after the beginning of the YouTube video.
  2. If you have access to a legal physical copy (DVD, etc.), you can use the TEACH Act exemption to show:
    1. the full performance of a non-dramatic literary or musical work
    2. "reasonable and limited portions" of dramatic works.
    3. Detailed guidance on using films under the TEACH Act exemption.
  3. If you have access to a legal physical copy (DVD, etc.), evaluate whether showing the clip is within the bounds of fair use. Complete a fair use checklist, decide whether your use is fair, and keep the checklist with your course files to document your good faith effort. Evaluate all four fair use factors holistically. Most UMKC instructors find the "amount and substantiality" and "effect upon the market" factors require the most careful thought:
    • "amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole."
      • Q: How much of a work can I use? A: The law does not set an amount. Always use no more than is needed to achieve your educational goal.
    • "the effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work."
      • Uses which are more likely to replace a sale are less likely to be fair (and more likely to get you sued).
      • Posting video from materials intended as a textbook for the course you are teaching is especially risky.
  4. If you, the instructor, are accessing the film through a commercial streaming service (Netflix, Amazon, etc.), you are only licensing the film and you are bound by the streaming service terms. The TEACH Act and fair use do not apply. Many streaming services limit subscribers to personal use only.
  5. Email copyright@umkc.edu if these options do not meet your needs.

How can I make course materials more affordable for my students?

I have more questions

  • Consult the detailed guidance in the rest of this copyright guide or email copyright@umkc.edu

Nothing on this guide is to be construed as legal advice. These pages are intended to provide information and guidance in the application of copyright law and to expand on the University of Missouri System Collected Rules and Regulations.

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